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The One List You Need Before Making Your Next Big Decision

As a homeowner, you consider the impact of a significant renovation on the value of your home. You know that a new kitchen will be a worthwhile investment, whereas a swimming pool may bring you enjoyment but less of a bump in resale value. In the same way, the savviest entrepreneurs also think about how investments they make in their business today will make their business attractive to a strategic acquirer…

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How to Get Your Employees to Care About Your Business

Are you struggling to get your employees to care as much as you do?

Having happy and engaged employees who deliver results for customers means you can fade into the background. And a company that can thrive without its owner is a lot more valuable than one where the founder has to crack the whip constantly.

As an owner, it’s natural to care about your company’s success.

Now imagine selling your business knowing exactly how far you could push an acquirer. Knowing an acquirer’s upper limit is challenging unless you have a bug planted in their board room. However, suppose your potential acquirer is a publicly-traded

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How to Decode an Acquirer’s Maximum Offer

Imagine walking into a car dealership knowing the lowest price the dealer will accept. That knowledge would give you an unfair advantage in negotiating. Instead, buying a car from a dealer often leaves us wondering if we could have pushed for a better deal.

Now imagine selling your business knowing exactly how far you could push an acquirer. Knowing an acquirer’s upper limit is challenging unless you have a bug planted in their board room. However, suppose your potential acquirer is a publicly-traded

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Hurricane Proof Your Business

Imagine you are house-hunting in South Florida. You’ve narrowed your search down to two waterfront homes. 

The first has great curb appeal but was built using standard materials. 

The second home also looks good on the outside, but the inside was built using insulated concrete forms (ICF) to withstand 200-mile-per-hour winds. Although it costs a little more, the second home is hurricane-proof. 

Which do you buy?

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Does Your Story Have a Villain?

Are you driven to prove someone wrong? Maybe an old boss? Or a prospective investor who belittled your idea? Being motivated to prove someone wrong can be a powerful force that drives you to do incredible things. For example, look at the story of California-based entrepreneur Jonathan Shroyer. From 1999 to 2019, Shroyer worked for organizations like Microsoft…

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4 Things Led to a Doubling of This Company’s Value

Sue Bryce had always dreamed of selling her photography education membership website, so when she received an inquiry offer from a private equity group doing a rollup in her industry, Bryce was excited.

Along with the website, Bryce’s company had several other revenue sources, including conferences, awards, and accreditations for photographers. All told, they were doing almost $7 million in revenue, and Bryce figured she had a shot at hitting her number.

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5 Lessons Josh Delaney Learned in Building a $25.8 Million Business in 4 Years

The word “optionality” comes up a lot these days, and you may wonder what exactly it means. In the context of business building, optionality is creating a company where you have lots of different avenues for reaching your goal(s).

Having optionality is the opposite of putting all of your eggs in one basket and is a common vein that runs through all of the value drivers we measure over at The Value Builder System™.

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How to Get Unruly Employees to Follow Your Standard Operating Procedures

Try this thought experiment: Divide your employees into two groups. The first group is made up of your rule followers. These are the employees who will do what you say, follow your processes, and generally behave the way you ask them to. 

The second group is your scoundrels. These are the creative spirits who are difficult to tame—the superstar salesperson who refuses to follow your sales process or the designer who insists on doing it their way. 

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The Downside of “Foxhole Leadership”

Basketball coach Don Meyer is famous for something he calls “The Foxhole Test.” He encourages players to imagine themselves in a life-or-death battle and asks them to pick the teammates they would want in the trenches with them. The test is designed to break down the inevitable cliques and friendships that evolve on a team and identify the true leaders that players trust with their lives.

Foxhole leaders are often known for getting in the trenches with their teams. They typically lead by example and never delegate a task they are unwilling to do themselves. As a result, Foxhole Leadership produces disciples willing to do just about anything for their leader.

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Why Your Employees Don’t Get It

Do you ever find yourself so frustrated with your employees it causes you to step in and do their jobs?
You realize that it will take much longer to train them to do something than it would for you to do it yourself, so you ask them to step aside and take over.

Read More ›
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The One List You Need Before Making Your Next Big Decision

As a homeowner, you consider the impact of a significant renovation on the value of your home. You know that a new kitchen will be a worthwhile investment, whereas a swimming pool may bring you enjoyment but less of a bump in resale value. In the same way, the savviest entrepreneurs also think about how investments they make in their business today will make their business attractive to a strategic acquirer…

Read More ›

How to Get Your Employees to Care About Your Business

Are you struggling to get your employees to care as much as you do?

Having happy and engaged employees who deliver results for customers means you can fade into the background. And a company that can thrive without its owner is a lot more valuable than one where the founder has to crack the whip constantly.

As an owner, it’s natural to care about your company’s success.

Now imagine selling your business knowing exactly how far you could push an acquirer. Knowing an acquirer’s upper limit is challenging unless you have a bug planted in their board room. However, suppose your potential acquirer is a publicly-traded

Read More ›

How to Decode an Acquirer’s Maximum Offer

Imagine walking into a car dealership knowing the lowest price the dealer will accept. That knowledge would give you an unfair advantage in negotiating. Instead, buying a car from a dealer often leaves us wondering if we could have pushed for a better deal.

Now imagine selling your business knowing exactly how far you could push an acquirer. Knowing an acquirer’s upper limit is challenging unless you have a bug planted in their board room. However, suppose your potential acquirer is a publicly-traded

Read More ›

Hurricane Proof Your Business

Imagine you are house-hunting in South Florida. You’ve narrowed your search down to two waterfront homes. 

The first has great curb appeal but was built using standard materials. 

The second home also looks good on the outside, but the inside was built using insulated concrete forms (ICF) to withstand 200-mile-per-hour winds. Although it costs a little more, the second home is hurricane-proof. 

Which do you buy?

Read More ›

Does Your Story Have a Villain?

Are you driven to prove someone wrong? Maybe an old boss? Or a prospective investor who belittled your idea? Being motivated to prove someone wrong can be a powerful force that drives you to do incredible things. For example, look at the story of California-based entrepreneur Jonathan Shroyer. From 1999 to 2019, Shroyer worked for organizations like Microsoft…

Read More ›

4 Things Led to a Doubling of This Company’s Value

Sue Bryce had always dreamed of selling her photography education membership website, so when she received an inquiry offer from a private equity group doing a rollup in her industry, Bryce was excited.

Along with the website, Bryce’s company had several other revenue sources, including conferences, awards, and accreditations for photographers. All told, they were doing almost $7 million in revenue, and Bryce figured she had a shot at hitting her number.

Read More ›

5 Lessons Josh Delaney Learned in Building a $25.8 Million Business in 4 Years

The word “optionality” comes up a lot these days, and you may wonder what exactly it means. In the context of business building, optionality is creating a company where you have lots of different avenues for reaching your goal(s).

Having optionality is the opposite of putting all of your eggs in one basket and is a common vein that runs through all of the value drivers we measure over at The Value Builder System™.

Read More ›

How to Get Unruly Employees to Follow Your Standard Operating Procedures

Try this thought experiment: Divide your employees into two groups. The first group is made up of your rule followers. These are the employees who will do what you say, follow your processes, and generally behave the way you ask them to. 

The second group is your scoundrels. These are the creative spirits who are difficult to tame—the superstar salesperson who refuses to follow your sales process or the designer who insists on doing it their way. 

Read More ›

The Downside of “Foxhole Leadership”

Basketball coach Don Meyer is famous for something he calls “The Foxhole Test.” He encourages players to imagine themselves in a life-or-death battle and asks them to pick the teammates they would want in the trenches with them. The test is designed to break down the inevitable cliques and friendships that evolve on a team and identify the true leaders that players trust with their lives.

Foxhole leaders are often known for getting in the trenches with their teams. They typically lead by example and never delegate a task they are unwilling to do themselves. As a result, Foxhole Leadership produces disciples willing to do just about anything for their leader.

Read More ›

Why Your Employees Don’t Get It

Do you ever find yourself so frustrated with your employees it causes you to step in and do their jobs?
You realize that it will take much longer to train them to do something than it would for you to do it yourself, so you ask them to step aside and take over.

Read More ›
It looks like there is no more content available.

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