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How Thinking Like an NFL GM May Help You Sell Your Company

Before putting your company on the market, creating a list of potential buyers for your company is paramount. Rather than courting generic investors, I’ve learned that founders that sell for the highest multiples understand the key players in their industry that are paying a premium for businesses like theirs.

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David vs. Goliath

We’re hardwired to cheer for an underdog. 

From Rocky versus Creed to, more recently, last year’s run by the Saint Peter’s Peacocks into the NCAA Elite Eight, we are captivated when an underdog pulls off an improbable upset against an overwhelming favorite.

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The Danger of Being Lured into a Proprietary Deal

If you were looking to buy a house, you wouldn’t want to compete with other bidders. Acquirers are no different.
They want to avoid competing with anyone to buy your business. Acquirers land a proprietary deal (or “prop deal”) by convincing you to sell your business without creating a marketplace for your company.

Read More ›

4 Things Led to a Doubling of This Company’s Value

Sue Bryce had always dreamed of selling her photography education membership website, so when she received an inquiry offer from a private equity group doing a rollup in her industry, Bryce was excited.

Along with the website, Bryce’s company had several other revenue sources, including conferences, awards, and accreditations for photographers. All told, they were doing almost $7 million in revenue, and Bryce figured she had a shot at hitting her number.

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How Hotjar™ Used a Beta Group to Bootstrap Their Way to $40 Million in ARR

There’s a well-trodden path to building a successful technology company: Develop an idea, raise a bunch of money, and sell your baby for a truckload. Most founders who chose this route are down to single-digit stakes of equity by the time they sell, but if the acquisition price is large enough, it works out just fine for everyone.

But it’s a high-stakes racket, and for every winner, there are probably dozens of losers in the ditch.

There is an alternative to jumping on the fundraising hamster wheel.

Read More ›

Evolution vs. Revolution

Sometimes the best business ideas are not really ideas at all. They are simply new ways of doing old things.

For example, Melissa Kwan created a business to help real estate agents manage their open house contacts. As she described when I interviewed her on Built to Sell Radio, it was a “bloated” piece of software.

Read More ›

One Counterintuitive Strategy Led to this $380 million Payday

When David Perry started his video game company, he filled a dartboard in his office with the names of companies he thought would want to buy Gaikai one day.

Why would a startup business with no revenue or employees be thinking about potential acquirers so early? For Perry, it comes down to something he refers to as “down the track thinking.”

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How to Get Rich

What’s the most reliable way to create financial independence?
 
Let’s set aside lottery winnings and inheritances because you have very little control over either. Let’s also eliminate endeavors like staring in Hollywood movies or playing professional sports because the odds of becoming wealthy in either pursuit are slim.

Read More ›

A Better Way to Assess Your Success as a Founder

How many employees do you have?

Unfortunately, the answer to that question will be how many people judge your achievements as an entrepreneur.

Tell them you have a couple of full-time people, and they may look down on you as a “wannabe” entrepreneur.

Read More ›
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How Thinking Like an NFL GM May Help You Sell Your Company

Before putting your company on the market, creating a list of potential buyers for your company is paramount. Rather than courting generic investors, I’ve learned that founders that sell for the highest multiples understand the key players in their industry that are paying a premium for businesses like theirs.

Read More ›

David vs. Goliath

We’re hardwired to cheer for an underdog. 

From Rocky versus Creed to, more recently, last year’s run by the Saint Peter’s Peacocks into the NCAA Elite Eight, we are captivated when an underdog pulls off an improbable upset against an overwhelming favorite.

Read More ›

The Danger of Being Lured into a Proprietary Deal

If you were looking to buy a house, you wouldn’t want to compete with other bidders. Acquirers are no different.
They want to avoid competing with anyone to buy your business. Acquirers land a proprietary deal (or “prop deal”) by convincing you to sell your business without creating a marketplace for your company.

Read More ›

4 Things Led to a Doubling of This Company’s Value

Sue Bryce had always dreamed of selling her photography education membership website, so when she received an inquiry offer from a private equity group doing a rollup in her industry, Bryce was excited.

Along with the website, Bryce’s company had several other revenue sources, including conferences, awards, and accreditations for photographers. All told, they were doing almost $7 million in revenue, and Bryce figured she had a shot at hitting her number.

Read More ›

How Hotjar™ Used a Beta Group to Bootstrap Their Way to $40 Million in ARR

There’s a well-trodden path to building a successful technology company: Develop an idea, raise a bunch of money, and sell your baby for a truckload. Most founders who chose this route are down to single-digit stakes of equity by the time they sell, but if the acquisition price is large enough, it works out just fine for everyone.

But it’s a high-stakes racket, and for every winner, there are probably dozens of losers in the ditch.

There is an alternative to jumping on the fundraising hamster wheel.

Read More ›

Evolution vs. Revolution

Sometimes the best business ideas are not really ideas at all. They are simply new ways of doing old things.

For example, Melissa Kwan created a business to help real estate agents manage their open house contacts. As she described when I interviewed her on Built to Sell Radio, it was a “bloated” piece of software.

Read More ›

One Counterintuitive Strategy Led to this $380 million Payday

When David Perry started his video game company, he filled a dartboard in his office with the names of companies he thought would want to buy Gaikai one day.

Why would a startup business with no revenue or employees be thinking about potential acquirers so early? For Perry, it comes down to something he refers to as “down the track thinking.”

Read More ›

How to Get Rich

What’s the most reliable way to create financial independence?
 
Let’s set aside lottery winnings and inheritances because you have very little control over either. Let’s also eliminate endeavors like staring in Hollywood movies or playing professional sports because the odds of becoming wealthy in either pursuit are slim.

Read More ›

A Better Way to Assess Your Success as a Founder

How many employees do you have?

Unfortunately, the answer to that question will be how many people judge your achievements as an entrepreneur.

Tell them you have a couple of full-time people, and they may look down on you as a “wannabe” entrepreneur.

Read More ›
It looks like there is no more content available.

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